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  • br Prevalence br Reference Study design HPV detection

    2020-08-28


    Prevalence
    Reference Study design HPV detection and targeted HPVs Sex N
    2001; 44: 236 patients treated at Seoul National University Hospital 18
    de Sanjosé S, Eur J Cancer
    de Sanjosé S, Eur J Cancer
    VAGINAL CANCER
    PENILE CANCER
    Alemany L, Eur Urol.
    Alemany L, Eur Urol.
    “HPV”: Human papillomavirus; “95% CI”: 95% Confidence Interval; “EIA”: Enzyme ImmunoAssay; “PCR”: Polymerase Chain Reaction; “SPF”: Short Primer Fragment; “TS”: Type Specific; “FFPE”: formalin-fixed paraffin-
    embedded; “RT”: radiotherapy; “CCRT”: concurrent chemoradiotherapy. a Includes cases from Bangladesh, India and The Republic of Korea.
    b Includes cases from Bangladesh, India, Israel, The Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Lebanon, Philippines, Taiwan and Turkey.
    c Includes cases from Australia, Bangladesh, India, Israel, The Republic of Korea, Kuwait, Philippines, Taiwan and Turkey.  Y.-T. Kim et al.
    Table 5
    HPV prevalence among head and neck cancer cases in the Republic of Korea, by study.
    Prevalence
    Reference Study design HPV detection and targeted HPVs Sex N
    297 University Dental Hospital
    Head and Neck Oncology Division of otorhinolaryngology
    Retrospective cross–sectional study. FFPE specimens from patients
    Retrospective cross–sectional study. FFPE tonsillar carcinoma tissues
    Retrospective cross–sectional study. FFPE specimens (1090) from
    “HPV”: Human papillomavirus; “95% CI”: 95% Confidence Interval; “PCR”: Polymerase Chain Reaction; “TS”: Type Specific; “FFPE”: formalin–fixed paraffin–embedded; “SCC”: squamous cell carcinoma; “HR”: High risk;
    Regarding data retrieved from the KCCR for the Z VAD FMK 1999–2009, oropharyngeal cancer increased significantly over this period (annual percent changes (APC) = 2.4%), particularly in men aged 30–59 (APC
    = 2.7%), whereas laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers markedly decreased in both sexes. Interestingly, tongue cancer increased gradu-ally 2.4% annually in both sexes [35]. Prior studies of head and neck cancers have reported higher in-cidence rates [36]. However, a broader range of tumour sites was used to define head and neck cancer (including larynx, oral cavity, or-opharynx, hypopharynx, nasopharynx, trachea, oesophagus, nasal cavity, and paranasal sinuses).
    Genital warts are common and highly infectious lesions. Although they are not life-threatening, the high infectivity, the high risk of re-currence, and the need of multiple treatments, are associated with a high social and economic impact [42]. Low risk HPV6 and HPV11 are estimated to cause approximately 90.0% of genital warts [4].
    Based on the update (until June 2016) of a systematic review of global estimates performed by Patel et al. [43], overall reported an-nual incidence of new genital warts ranged from 85 to 205 cases per 100,000 in both sexes combined (77–560 in men and 76–790 in women, respectively), with higher incidence in people younger than 30 years (230–790 in both sexes combined, 130–560 in men and 320–1030 in women, respectively) [44]. Particularly in Korea, limited data on the burden of genital warts is available. However, some es-timates have been reported recently. A recent cross-sectional study evaluated the prevalence and socio-economic burden of genital warts using national claims data from the Health Insurance Review and Assessment of Korea [45]. In this study the overall prevalence and socio-economic burden of genital warts increased during the last 9 years (in 2015 was 11.6 and 3.6 per 100,000 men and women, re-spectively), although significant differences were observed by sex. The female prevalence increased until 2012 (highest in females aged 20–29), and decreased thereafter (APC = 3·6%). In contrast, the male prevalence increased continuously over time (APC = 11·6%), espe-cially in those aged 20–49 (Fig. 3). Variations in prevalence have been reported in other Korean studies [46,47].
    There is also limited Korean data regarding the prevalence of HPV in genital warts. In a study examining the HPV prevalence in 150 consecutive male patients with histopathologic-confirmed genital warts from a single private clinic, LR-HPV types were detected in 97.0% of cases (only LR-HPV types in 76.5% of cases). In 121 cases (91.7%), HPV6 or HPV11 or both were observed. HPV6 was the most common type (76.5% globally, 50.8% as a single infection and 25.8% as multiple infections) [48].
    4. HPV screening and vaccination programme in Korea
    4.1. Cervical Cancer Prevention Strategies in Korea
    4.1.1. Cervical cancer screening programme